This Special Thought Of The Day Has Been Brought To You By An LSAT Test This Special Thought Of The Day Has Been Brought To You By An LSAT Test
For those of you who don’t know, I have been studying for that wretched test that is the LSAT for the last couple of... This Special Thought Of The Day Has Been Brought To You By An LSAT Test

For those of you who don’t know, I have been studying for that wretched test that is the LSAT for the last couple of months. Although most of the studying for this test has been incredibly frustrating and rather dull, I did manage to uncover something very insightful for all of us to marinate on from question #11, Section 3, of prep Test #62(Dec).

Counselor: Many people assume that personal conflicts are inevitable, but that assumption is just not so. Personal conflicts arise primarily because people are being irrational. For instance, people often find it easier to ascribe bad qualities to a person than good ones–even when there is more evidence of the latter. If someone suspects that a friend is unreliable, for example, a single instance may turn this suspicion into a feeling of certainty, whereas a belief that someone is reliable is normally built up only after many years of personal interactions.

I wish this little passage didn’t hold as much truth in my life as it does. How about yours?

No comments so far.

Be first to leave comment below.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *